real life test kitchen: makin’ whoopie (pies)

whoopie pies!

Even though I’m currently a Midwesterner, my East Coast sensibilities haven’t left me. I talk too fast, I walk fast enough to plow down slow moving tourists, and I often crave whoopie pies. The decidedly Yankee treat consists of two cake-like cookies with a rich creme applied with a heavy hand between them. According to New England lore, they were originally named so because finding one in your lunch pail would cause you to yell out “Whoopie!” at the decadent sight. There are all types of flavors to consider but the original chocolate cake and vanilla cream are my favorites. The recipe after the jump is, as far as I’m concerned, the gold standard for traditional whoopie pies. I’ve tried others where the filling is pure frosting or (gasp!) marshmallow fluff or the cakes are too cookie-like. Don’t be fooled by impostors. — Katie D. Click for authentic whoopie pies!

Yankee Style Whoopie Pies

Makes: about 14 pies

Whoopie Pies:
¼ cup Crisco
1 cup milk
1 cup sugar
1 egg
1 tsp. vanilla
1 cup flour
¼ cup + 1 tbsp. cocoa
1 ½ tsp. baking soda
1 tsp. salt

• Blend together Crisco, milk, sugar, egg, and vanilla.
• Add the dry ingredients (flour, cocoa, baking soda, and salt) and mix until well blended.
• Drop by the tablespoonful on an ungreased cookie sheet.
• Bake 8 minutes at 375° until a toothpick comes out clean. If it doesn’t, bake an additional 2 minutes. Make sure you keep an eye on them! Whoopie Pies are easily burned if left unattended.
• Remove from pan immediately to cool on a wire rack.

Crème filling:
½ cup butter
½ cup Crisco
1 cup sugar
1 tbsp. flour
1 tsp. vanilla
½ cup of warm whole milk

• Beat ingredients together with a mixer or a stand until fluffy crème forms (this will take you a very, very long time — but it’s totally worth it!).
• When the Whoopie cookies are cool, match each cookie with its closest sibling in size.
• Spread a generous amount of filling on the flat side and place another Whoopie cookie on top.

From our partners

Well, they certainly look delish Katie! As a Pa girl, Whoopie Pies are a cherished fave of my youth. (Central PA is the 2nd pocket in America where the Whoopie Pies are a local fave) My grandma and I made these in her kitchen on cold winter days… Anyway, here in L.A. I’ve seen a Whoopie Pies a whole lot lately. Even at my local grocery store – sadly they was filled with the dreaded marshmallow fluff – a crime against Whoopies if you ask me.

Looking forward to trying this recipe – my other big problem is that (in my memories at least) the chocolate cake of a Whoopie Pie wasn’t so sweet – more like a dark chocolate taste – and a lot of the current imposters are sickly sweet cakes.

sarahc

I love whoopie pies! We used to have them at summer camp for dessert on cookout days – the kitchen staff would bring them out in giant cardboard boxes – whoopie pies galore! The cookies were so moist that bits would stick to the tips of my fingers in the summer heat. Delicious days those were. Thanks for sharing!

shelterrific » Blog Archive » five things we learned last week

[…] 1) Whoopie pies bring back happy memories, but don’t trust impostors! Tyna says, “As a Pa girl, Whoopie Pies are a cherished fave of my youth. (Central PA is the 2nd pocket in America where the Whoopie Pies are a local fave) My grandma and I made these in her kitchen on cold winter days… Anyway, here in L.A. I’ve seen a Whoopie Pies a whole lot lately. Even at my local grocery store – sadly they were filled with the dreaded marshmallow fluff – a crime against Whoopies if you ask me.” Click for tried-and-true whoopie pies. […]

Laurie

So I made these last night and yum!

I felt like my cookie batter was a bit runny – probably because I used non-fat milk… but the cookies puffed up enough. Though, they did not look as round and perfect as yours!

The cream filling was perfect, not too sweet and no filmy aftertaste. I used non-fat milk for that too – all I had.

I will definitely make these again – thanks!