help! our pumpkin grew moldy!

pumpkin

Have I told you how beyond excited I am to be enjoying our first Halloween in the suburbs? I’ve already showed off a successful wreath project, but now I must report a dilemma I need your help with! We carved a pumpkin on Sunday night, with our spooky house number engraved into it. Created some breathing holes for air in the back. Spritzed it with a hot-pepper solution to keep the squirrels more or less at bay. And now look it! It’s growing black fuzzy mold. Talk about scary! Luckily we still have a few pumpkins inside that we haven’t carved yet. How do we make sure they don’t meet the same fate by Sunday? What did we do wrong? What’s the point of carving pumpkins if you can’t put them on the porch to show off? Seasoned Halloween vets, please share your wisdom! — Angela M.

From our partners
Christina S.

Try putting vaseline on the parts that you have carved out. It helps seal the exposed part of the pumpkin and will keep mold at bay for at least a few days.

Jenn

Ooh Ooh, I know this one! Don’t know where I heard it, probably going to have to give cred. to Martha for this one, but if you smear Vaseline (gross, I know) on the exposed carving, it inhibits the water intake, hence slowing the growth of mold!

I stumbled across this earlier this week:

http://www.myscienceproject.org/pumpkin.html

I tried WD-40 one year and it seemed to help keep rot a bay, but mostly I find making sure that the weather in which your pumpkin sits is suitable is your safest bet! (Muggy or damp weather allows carved pumpkins to fester, so find a cool, dry place to store it during the day when it’s not needed to show off!)

shelterrific » Blog Archive » how to avoid a moldy pumpkin

[…] it’d be a good idea to remind ourselves what we learned last year. As you may recall, our 2010 porch pumpkins had a tough time. First, they got nibbled on by some squirrels. Then, they got moldy and basically caved […]