cottage renovation: taking down the walls and ceiling

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When we last left off on our Cottage Renovation saga, we were filling you in on the messy, but necessary work we had to do on the sill beam and the support of the house. As that work was being completed by our contractor, Chad decide to tackle another dirty job: the tear down of almost all of our walls and ceiling.

Once we started working to strengthen the outside of the house, we realized how wonky the interior was. Some of our walls were supremely messed up — especially those on the back of the house where most of the water damage had occurred. The ceiling had a bizarre, 70s-popcorn texture all over it, and the walls weren’t much better. We had often dreamed of taking the main part of the house — the kitchen, living room and dining area — and making it one big open space. We also fantasized about raising the ceiling to give us more height. After weighing the cost vs the benefits, we decided to take it all down.

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Chad crowned himself deconstructor-in-chief and hit everything with a crowbar. This video below shows a little bit of what that was like.

What exactly did we find under our walls and above our ceiling? Nothing you would ever want in your house! The insulation in the ceiling was layers deep – some of it was grey and moldy. In between that was decades-worth of mouse nests filled with droppings. As someone who suffers from allergies, it’s a wonder my head didn’t explode every time I walked into the house. In between the walls was the dusty remains of some powdery substance that once was insulation, and of course, more mouse poop.

We also discovered that our roof wasn’t being supported properly. Also, in the attic space was the remnants of an old chimney. Some brilliant person had removed the bottom half, but left the top half, unsupported and made of bricks, just hanging out in our attic and resting the ceiling. That had to come out, too. After the whole space was clear and open, our contractor calculated the highest height we could raise the ceiling and laid down new beams.

After this main living/dining space was done, we decided to tackle the bedroom, too. The difference in air quality was so remarkable, we knew we couldn’t leave the bedroom as it was (i.e. also filled with mold and mouse poop). Here’s a peak at what the finished space looked like. I’ll do a separate post to fill you in on the insulation we chose — and how awesome the new space is going to be!

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