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turkey
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our best 4th of july recipes for a spectacular weekend

It’s hard to believe the 4th of July is already upon us! Here’s a few of our favorite, no-fuss, serves-a-crowd recipes to get you out of the kitchen and enjoying yourself.

1. Easy berry crumble.

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2. Roast chicken on the grill. Spatchcocking! Make it your friend.

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3. Green pea hummus dip. So easy, so tasty!

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4. Pizza with fresh tomatoes and corn pesto. Summer on a plate.

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5. Strawberry and pea shoot salad.

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6. Cinnamon and cardamon oatmeal cookie, ice-cream sandwiches.

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What are you cooking over the 4th? Tell us about your favorite recipes!

From our partners

the deal on farmigo: how this online farmer’s market is improving our meals and school

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A few weeks ago one of our friends and fellow elementary school mom had the idea to bring Farmigo to our community. The concept is simple. Order fresh farm goods online through the easy-to-use site, pick up your edibles once a week at her house, and a portion of the sale gets donated to our local school. In the first week, we raised over $600.

Clicking through Farmigo you can find all the staples you need: bread, eggs, milk, meat, and of course, fresh veggies and fruit. Start browsing around and before you know it you are adding things to your basket that whet your appetite and inspire the chef in you. The first week, I admit went a little order-happy and bought more stuff than we could finish off in a week, but now I seem to be in a groove. I found the key is use Farmigo to supplement the trips we take the main supermarket, and the treat is discovering ready-made short cuts that make getting a healthy dinner on the table during the week super simple. We currently have fresh ramp-ravioli and spinach pesto in the fridge.  Today, I’m going to bring a cup of bone broth with me to work as part of my low-cal lunch. And, I can’t wait to eat our fiddlehead ferns! The plan is just to keep them simple, with a light saute of butter and lemon juice.

Benzi Ronen, founder and CEO of Farmigo, told Forbes this week that he thinks his start up will kill the supermarket. I don’t know if I agree with that. The physical act of hand selecting your food with your eyes and hands and nose should never be fully replaced with online ordering. It’s skill set and social ritual that is too crucial to our civilized lives. But if you have a hard time making it to the weekly farmer’s market, and consider buying locally sourced food a priority for you, Farmigo is a no-brainer. The fact that it helps our school with additional funds is only a bonus. We’ll be using the money, in part, to start a vegetable learning garden at our school. How cool is that?

Learn more about Farmigo here. And if you’re already using it, tell us what’s in your basket!

From our partners

real life test kitchen: lemonade’s sweet potato with parsley and pistachio vinaigrette

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The other day I was in Los Angeles for work, and decided to go for a walk. The first thing you notice when you are walking in Los Angeles is that no one else is. Then you start to notice how pretty the side streets are, with rust-free vintage cars parked here and there and lovely succulent gardens in front of cute little bungalows. Of course, I was in West Hollywood, one of its prettiest neighborhoods. Wondering around in search of place to eat, I stumbled upon Leomonade, hidden behind a tall green flowering hedge on Beverly. It was the answer to all my cravings. Surprisingly tasty, healthy food served without attitude at great prices. I ordered a three dish sampler for about $8 and loved it so much I went back again. My favorite dish was sweet potato with parsley and pistachio vinaigrette. I could have eaten an entire bowl.

Exiting the city from LAX, I discovered the Lemonade cookbook, which not only had the recipe for my sweet potato dish, but a whole lot more. I’ve got a long list of things I want to try from it, but this was on the top of my list. I made it on Monday and have been enjoying all week. Now it’s your turn.

Lemonade’s Sweet Potato With Parsley and Pistachio Vinaigrette

What You Need:

1 lb of sweet potatoes (I amped this up and used about four medium sized ones) – sliced and then cut into one inch cubes
1/4 cup of olive oil
1/2 pistachio vinaigrette (more on that below)
1/2 cup shelled, toasted and crushed pistachios (I put them in the toaster oven for about 4 minutes)
1/2 chopped parsley
salt and pepper

For the Vinaigrette:
2 tbls sherry vinegar
1 tsp lemon juice
1 tsp orange juice
1 tbls honey or agave
1/2 shallot chopped
1/2 tsp course sea salt
1/2 tsp fresh ground pepper
3/4 pistachio oil (see below_

For Pistachio Oil
1/4 cup shelled pistachios, toasted
1/2 cup canola oil


How To Make

1. Preheat oven to 400.
2. Cup up potatoes and then place them on a baking sheet in a single layer.
3. Drizzle with olive oil, salt and pepper. Toss.
4. Place in oven and bake until tender, about 30 minutes. Stir occasionally.
5. Meanwhile, toast and crush your pistachios. Enough for tossing in the salad and for the oil.
6. Take a 1/4 cup of those pistachios and put them in a blender with canola oil. Blend at high speed for about a minute. Pour that into a glass or jar and set aside.
7. Mix vinegar, honey, lemon and orange juices, shallot, salt and pepper in large bowl. Pour pistachio oil on top. Include the goop that may have settled. I used about half of my pistachio oil. Taste the dressing and test to your liking.
8. Take the sweet potatoes out of the oven and let them cool.
9. Then add sweet potatoes to the dressing in the bowl, toss in the rest of the toasted, crushed pistachios and fresh parsley.
10. Toss and eat!

From our partners

everything we’ve ever written about thanksgiving

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This is the week! The week where we celebrate our favorite culinary holiday, Thanksgiving. We love it so much we celebrate it twice! First, we go to a dear friend’s house on Thursday. This year our plan is to contribute a dessert and a salad. We know the host will have a pumpkin pie handy, so we’re adding a something non traditional to the mix this year. I’m going to attempt to make Crack Pie, made famous by Momofuku Milk Bar. More soon on how that goes. Then, on Saturday we will have our own mini Thanksgiving, because we cannot survive a winter without turkey soup, and turkey soup cannot be made without roasted remains. Though we usually opt for a simple, dry brine, this year we’re going to do something new. We are going to spatchcock our turkey — which means to remove its backbone and splay it out flatly in the pan. We’ve had great success doing this with whole chickens, so I have confidence this will be great. It’s fast (45 minutes!) and the skin is super crispy.

Now you know our plans for this week, here’s a handy link list of learnings from year’s past. Good luck with your feasts this year. Tell us what you’re cooking up!

The most yummy Brussels sprouts, ever.

What we learned hosting Thanksgiving last year.

How do you cook your bird?

How do you take your cranberry sauce?


Leftover ideas: sweet potato pancakes

What to do with leftover pumpkin

Brendon’s pecan pie

Leftover love


Prize-winning pumpkin pie

Domino’s One Hour Thanksgiving

Bourbon sweet potato Bundt cake

Cider glazed sunchokes and carrots

Chilewich’s lovely chargers

Super smart apron

And, don’t forget to polish grandma’s silverware

From our partners

real life test kitchen: how to grill “roast” chicken

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During the winter, grilled chicken is a staple Sunday night dinner. It makes your house smell great and the leftovers are great for soups or lunches during the week. In the summer time switch to the grill, and the whole chickens go away — mostly because of our fear of under cooking. When I spotted this technique in the August issue of Bon Appetite magazine, I decided to give it a go. It calls for a whole chicken with the “backbone removed.” I suppose you could ask your butcher to do this, but I hacked it out on my own — which is easier than I thought it would be. Once you remove the backbone, the chicken will be split, and can lay down rather flatly on the grill. This method is so simple, it’s really not a recipe at all.

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Here’s how you do it: rub olive oil and salt and pepper all over your chicken. Heat up the grill to about 400-450 degrees. Place a bunch of whole scallions, long fresh rosemary twigs, and a halved garlic bulb directly on the grill. Place the chicken skin side up on the herb pile. Close the lid and let it cook for about 40 minutes. After that, remove the charred herbs and brush some new olive oil on the skin side of the chicken. Flip it over and cook on the grill for another 10 minutes or so until nice and crispy. Remove from the grill and let it rest for a few minutes before serving. For some extra flavor, roast some additional scallions to serve along with it in the oven, for about 5 minutes. The result is incredible moist, flavorful chicken that you can’t stop eating. Enjoy!

From our partners