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2013cocktails
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toasting marshmellows sundance style? you need some rustic roasters

rusticroasters

This weekend, tens of thousands of people will be descending on the snowy little ski town of Park City Utah, to schmooze, deal, gawk and watch hours of movies in dark theaters at the Sundance Film Festival. I’ve been lucky enough to attend more than once, and whenever I come home I want to add a little mountain cabin style to home — perhaps a Navajo rug or maybe something sheepskin. This year I’m observing from afar, but I have my eye on these antler roasters from Rustic Roasters. Made by Steven Wymer out of either reclaimed branches or naturally shed antlers, they are selected, then lovingly shaped and stained, cured and crafted. Handles are colored and coated with non-synthetic finishes and the toasting rods are food-grade stainless steel. They’ll bring your s’mores to the next level — even if they’re being made on the back of your deck in a suburban firepit. $129 for a set of four. See more at rusticroasters.com.

From our partners

is this STILL the best chocolate chip cookie recipe, ever?

chocolatechipbestever

When we first started this blog, back in 2007, this recipe caused a great deal of debate. We still make it all time, and realized it had been years since we shared with you. Here it is fresh for 2014, with a nice photo. The recipe came from Wendy Gaynor, who started the bakery Ruby & Violette years ago. The shop is now run by different, industrious women and the cookies they sell on West 50th Street are still beyond delicious. Below is Wendy’s original recipe. We suggest serving them warm with a tall glass of cold milk.


Wendy Gaynor’s ‘Perfect’ Chocolate Chunk Cookies

What You Need:
8 ounces (2 sticks) unsalted butter, at room temperature
1 cup packed dark brown sugar
1/2 cup granulated sugar
2 large eggs
2 cups all-purpose flour
1 teaspoon salt
3/4 teaspoon baking soda
1 teaspoon pure vanilla extract
4 cups semisweet chunks (preferably imported).

How to Make
1. Place the butter in a large bowl and cream at high speed until fluffy. Add the sugars and beat until light and fluffy, about 4 minutes, scraping down sides of bowl occasionally. Beat in eggs, one at a time, until completely mixed.
2. In a separate bowl, mix flour, salt and baking soda. Add to the butter mixture at low speed until just combined and add vanilla extract. Beat on medium speed, scraping bowl down, until blended. Do not overmix.
3. Add chocolate chunks and mix till thoroughly combined. Refrigerate batter until cold, preferably overnight.
4. Preheat a conventional oven to 350 degrees or a convection oven to 300 degrees, and line several baking sheets with parchment paper. Drop heaping spoonfuls of batter 2 inches apart on the lined baking sheets and bake, turning tray once, until golden brown around edges and soft (but not bubbly), about 9 minutes in a convection oven or 12 in a conventional one. Cool on a wire rack. Yield: 36 to 72 cookies, depending on size.

*This recipe appeared in The New York Times on October 27, 2002. Click here to read our original post with all the comments and tell us: Is this the best chocolate chip cookie recipe?

From our partners

tea & crumpets anyone? we’re gearing up for downton abbey’s return!

It seems like ages since we’ve visited the regal halls of Downton Abbey. We’ve gotten over the devastation of last season‘s tragic ending, and are ready to don our long white gloves and lift our pinky fingers with the Crawley clan once more: Season four kicks off on PBS this Sunday, January 5th. To celebrate, we thought it might nice to add a little faded Edwardian charm to our homes — or menus. Here are a few ways you can give your own abbey a bit of Downton-ness.

1. Have a proper cup of tea like Lady Mary.

marydrinkstea

It amazes us how many people in America don’t know how to make a proper cup of tea. Restaurants are the worst culprits when they bring the teapot full of water and a cup with unopened tea bag on the side. You have to pour the boiling water directly onto the teabag, people! In the teapot! Also, as recommended at Yorkshire Tea‘s site, you should use two teabags per four cup pot. Let the tea brew about five minutes before serving. Having a dainty little cup like Mary’s to sip out of is nice as well. This Noritake Crestwood Gold China set has a very similar elegance.

2. Bake yourself a Bundt cake in a beautiful vintage pan.

downtoncakepans

The wall of copper cake and tart molds on display in the Downton Kitchen is enviable, but you can start your own today but doing a simple seplace on Etsy. Acquiring the pan is only half the step. Next you need to whip a lovely cake like Daisy, above. We have some favorites, like this peaches and cream cake, but this ginger one made with molasses and stout by Melissa Clark has been on our bake-soon list for sometime. How very, very British!

 3. Dine by candelabra light.

downtondining

Few things could transport us to post-War England more than dining table lit by candelabra’s. This set from Hawksworth Eyres & Co are heirloom quality. But for a quick fix that won’t break the bank, try this one from Food Service Warehouse for less than $60.

Are you having a Downton viewing party at your home? Tell us how you are celebrating and what you’re looking forward to in the next season. For more inspiration, see our previous Downton posts here.

 

From our partners

two cocktails recipes from julibox to help you say goodbye to 2013

2013cocktails

Julibox

Lets face it. We don’t make cocktails nearly enough at home. Sure, we serve beer and uncork wine bottles a couple times a week, but when was last time you got out the cocktail shaker and mixed one up? One of our (more fun) resolutions for 2014? Make more cocktails! Starting tonight, with New Year’s Eve 2013. On our bar menu is an old favorite with a slight twist, and a fancy little number that puts the same bottle of cognac to use. Helping us along the way is a new site and subscription service called Julibox. If you subscribe to Julibox for about $40 a month, you will get a box mailed to you that has the fixings for four cocktails plus recipes. (True, a bit expensive for four drinks you make yourself, but a nice gift idea for those want to move beyond craft beer of the month!) These aren’t just any recipes, but recipes that have been developed and heartily tested by expert curators, including Paul Sevigny, a well known Miami bartender (and Chloe’s brother). What we’re excited about is the idea of a cocktail community that exchanges recipes and tales of mixology, which is what the Julibox site curates. In the spirit of sharing, here are two recipes of theirs, both of which use pear cognac. Cheers — And happy new year!!


Winter Side Car

Side cars are one of our favorite cocktails to drink on a cold blustery night. This version is made with pear cognac (or brandy if you can’t find the cognac) and Disaronno. We’ll make this one in a pitcher — so times it by six!
What you need:
1 3/4 oz Xante Pear Cognac
3/4 oz Disaronno liquor
the juice of one lemon
For garnish:
lemon rind twist
sugar rim
How To Make
1. Rub the a slice of lemon around the rim of a martini glass.
2. Pour a pile of sugar into a saucer plate and dip the glass into it.
3. Pour the cognac and Disaronno into a shaker filled with ice.
4. Squeeze in the lemon juice.
5. Shake vigorously for 10 to 15 seconds.
6. Strain into the sugar-rimmed glass and garnish with a twist.

Fleur-De-Lys
Because everyone needs a little bubbly on New Year’s Eve, this lovely drink uses the same cognac as the Winter Side Car, but is topped off with some sparkling wine.
What You Need:
1 3/4 oz Xante Pear Cognac
2 oz brut champagne or sparkling wine
1 tsp of granulated sugar
juice of half a lemon
Garnish:
Lemon twist
How To Make:
1. Combine the lemon juice and sugar in a cocktail shaker filled with ice.
2. Add cognac and shake until very cold.
3. Strain into a large coup glass.
4. Top with champagne and garnish with a twist.

From our partners

post off: what christmas cookies are you making this year?

Can you believe we have only one weekend left until Christmas?! I am seriously missing the time we lost because Thanksgiving was so late this year. My weekend will be a cookie-making frenzy in an attempt to catch up before the big day, because it just isn’t the holidays without having certain cookies in the house.

One of my musts are pizzelles, which I make on my waffle press religiously each year in honor of my Great Aunt Jean, who could have started her own business based on the hundreds she made and gave away every year. I also will make a version of a Russian teacake from this Betty Crocker recipe — delicious butter balls covered in confection sugar.

Dark chocolate crinkles are another staple, and I have my eye on this recipe from Crunchy Creamy Sweet.

I am also craving pignoli cookies, like the ones I used to buy when I lived right in the heart of Little Italy, on Mulberry Street, in the 90s.

What are your holiday cookie staples? I’d love to know.

From our partners