eco-friendly art

Want to buy some original art while doing something good for the planet? Check out the incredible project the artist Sighn has taken on over at Multi Polar Projects. The woodworking artist decided to cut out the words “it’s ok” one million times using the scrap wood leftover from larger projects. Each piece is hand cut and numbered by the artist himself. Sighn is selling the wood cuts in batches as he makes them, and 1 tree will be planted for each one sold. There is a great video detailing his process that you can check out here. Then hop on over here and purchase your very own wood cut for just $20. I purchased mine several months ago (it’s # 2,044) and set it atop my bedroom mirror. Here it catches just enough light to cast shadows of affirmation each morning and night. — Erica P.

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meg’s green finds: ugallery.com art

Maybe I use the term “green” too loosely, but I tend to include artists and artwork in the green category. My justification is that buying from artists usually means supporting an independent business with a (generally speaking) small carbon footprint. So I was excited to learn recently of Ugallery.com, an online gallery of reasonably priced student art. Don’t worry, the site isn’t a hodgepodge of any old student shlock–a panel curates the site and only accepts about 25% of the work submitted for sale. A few of the pieces that caught my eye: Bart Dluhy‘s “Pile Up” ($90); Brian O’Doherty‘s “DC Curve” ($70); and Robert Beck‘s “Wagon Hill Farm” (above, $80). — Meg D.

Read more of Meg’s tips for stylish, green living at her blog, Style Saves the World.

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meg's green finds: ugallery.com art

Maybe I use the term “green” too loosely, but I tend to include artists and artwork in the green category. My justification is that buying from artists usually means supporting an independent business with a (generally speaking) small carbon footprint. So I was excited to learn recently of Ugallery.com, an online gallery of reasonably priced student art. Don’t worry, the site isn’t a hodgepodge of any old student shlock–a panel curates the site and only accepts about 25% of the work submitted for sale. A few of the pieces that caught my eye: Bart Dluhy‘s “Pile Up” ($90); Brian O’Doherty‘s “DC Curve” ($70); and Robert Beck‘s “Wagon Hill Farm” (above, $80). — Meg D.

Read more of Meg’s tips for stylish, green living at her blog, Style Saves the World.

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steal this idea: egg carton mini cupcake holder


UPDATE: We received so many concerned responses about this post, we did some reseplace on our end and I contacted the owner of Coffee to a Tea, where I purchased the above cupcakes. First, you are correct, readers — one should NOT re-use cardboard cartons that previously housed eggs; it is a health risk. From what we could find online, the plasticky versions are okay, but you’d want to wash them thoroughly first. Second, Coffee to a Tea does NOT reuse cartons — they buy them fresh. The following is an email we received back from owner Jilyan:

We really love that you love the egg carton idea so much! Thanks for posting about it. We most certainly do NOT use egg cartons that have housed eggs. You and your fellow bloggers are correct, that would be unsafe food handling. We purchase the unused egg cartons from a local dairy farm specifically for packaging our mini cupcakes. So please continue to enjoy our little guys worry free, and feel good about it since they are recyclable!
Thanks again,
Jilyan
Sugar Rush Baking Company

So there you have it, readers. Thanks everyone for waking me up about this. And now, let’s all enjoy a cupcake! –Mary T.

When I picked up some cupcakes recently from West Seattle’s Coffee to a Tea With Sugar, I was just as delighted by the packaging as I was by the product. Using an a fresh egg carton to house mini cupcakes is a great way to recycle, keeps the cupcakes from being crushed, and just looks really fun, too. Try this at home! –Mary T.

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meg’s green finds: bella pet beds

I love the coiled look and dog-friendly “cave shape” of Bella Beds. I recently discovered them while perusing the new online retailer StructuredGreen.com, which carries very stylish home items from 30+ manufacturers of green products. The Bella Bed is made with Eco2 cotton recycled from pre-consumer apparel fiber and is stuffed with recycled soda bottles, or PET. Our one-year-old pup, Cole, might try to uncoil the bed, but our twelve-year-old Portuguese water dog, King Oberon, would definitely plop right in for a nice, snore-filled eco-slumber. Available here for $79.99 and up.

Read more of Meg’s tips for stylish, green living at her blog, Style Saves the World.

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