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meg's green find: woof sachet

With the first birthday of Cole, our rescue pup, fast approaching, I’ve had my eyes peeled for a perfectly dogtastic birthday gift for the little scrapper. Right now, I’m feeling pretty enamored with this adorable Woof Sachet. It’s filled with lavender – a delish smelling natural flea repellent – and slips right onto a dog collar. It could be an excellent quasi-bow-tie look for Cole on his big day. Of course, since he can’t eat it or even chew on it, Cole probably won’t think the Woof Sachet is half as cool as I do. So I’ll also let him dig into a big bag of his favorite natural Zuke’s treats. Woof Sachet, $13.50, available at Zanisa. — Meg D.

Read more of Meg’s tips for stylish, green living at her blog, Style Saves the World.

meg’s green find: woof sachet

With the first birthday of Cole, our rescue pup, fast approaching, I’ve had my eyes peeled for a perfectly dogtastic birthday gift for the little scrapper. Right now, I’m feeling pretty enamored with this adorable Woof Sachet. It’s filled with lavender – a delish smelling natural flea repellent – and slips right onto a dog collar. It could be an excellent quasi-bow-tie look for Cole on his big day. Of course, since he can’t eat it or even chew on it, Cole probably won’t think the Woof Sachet is half as cool as I do. So I’ll also let him dig into a big bag of his favorite natural Zuke’s treats. Woof Sachet, $13.50, available at Zanisa. — Meg D.

Read more of Meg’s tips for stylish, green living at her blog, Style Saves the World.

book excerpt: make your own herbal flea powder!

The folks at Chronicle Books were kind enough to let us post this ‘lil excerpt from the book Eco Dog: Healthy Living for Your Pet. It’s written by Corbett Marshall and Jim Deskevich, the talents behind Variegated textiles, and must-visit store in Catskill, NY.

There are many flea products on the market that are made from chemicals intended to kill the pests in your pet’s coat. This may seem like an easy and effective option, but remember that chemicals toxic enough to kill fleas are not going to be healthy for your pet. Putting these chemicals directly on your dog’s coat — the easiest place for him to ingest them — just doesn’t make sense. We offer an alternative, in the form of powdered herbs meant to repel the fleas, while being harmless to your dog.

Ingredients
Eucalyptus, Rosemary, Lavender, Fennel, Yellow Dock, Pennyroyal

How To
One: Combine as many of the powdered herbs you can find.
Two: Mix together equal parts of each herb in a shaker-top jar.
Three: Brush your pet’s coat backward with your hand or a comb while sprinkling the powder onto the base of the hairs. Apply sparingly, paying special attention to the neck, back, and belly.
Four: Put your pet outside for a little while afterward, so his pets escape into your yard, not our carpet.

For more great eco-friendly pet tips, pick up a copy of Eco Dog. You’ll even find a few craft ideas (like tote bags) in their for you, too.!

photo by Aimee Herring

post off: what's your recipe deal breaker?


Photo via Amazon.com.

In The New York Times yesterday there was an article about “recipe deal breakers”: instructions in a recipe that immediately turn you off from making it. The piece had me laughing out loud, and the comments from readers were even better. If you haven’t read it yet, take a look. As someone who cooks quite a bit, I’d like to say there aren’t too many things I won’t try, but the truth is I can claim plenty of recipe deal breakers:

“When your candy thermometer reaches 300°F…”

Ummm, no thanks. I don’t own a candy thermometer. I don’t really want to deal with fussy temperature readings and molten hot liquid at the same time.

“… and let marinate 48 hours.”

Well I’d like to eat dinner today, not two days from now, so I think I’ll pass.

“…cilantro.”

I hate the stuff.

And the list goes on, trust me. So, Shelterrific readers, I’d love to hear from you about your own recipe deal breakers. Where do you draw the line? –Erica P

post off: what’s your recipe deal breaker?


Photo via Amazon.com.

In The New York Times yesterday there was an article about “recipe deal breakers”: instructions in a recipe that immediately turn you off from making it. The piece had me laughing out loud, and the comments from readers were even better. If you haven’t read it yet, take a look. As someone who cooks quite a bit, I’d like to say there aren’t too many things I won’t try, but the truth is I can claim plenty of recipe deal breakers:

“When your candy thermometer reaches 300°F…”

Ummm, no thanks. I don’t own a candy thermometer. I don’t really want to deal with fussy temperature readings and molten hot liquid at the same time.

“… and let marinate 48 hours.”

Well I’d like to eat dinner today, not two days from now, so I think I’ll pass.

“…cilantro.”

I hate the stuff.

And the list goes on, trust me. So, Shelterrific readers, I’d love to hear from you about your own recipe deal breakers. Where do you draw the line? –Erica P