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cottage renovation: choosing a paint color

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As fall’s rainy months kick in, we are in a race to finish the exterior on our river cottage renovation. After removing the old and worn stucco, replacing the sill beam, raising the house and digging a french drain, we were ready to chose the siding. We had a great deal of debate about whether to go the least inexpensive route (vinyl) or the most expensive (a concrete composite, like Hardy board). In the end we went with cedar planks, which are classic and strong. Another feature to the cedar planks, which could be a pro or con depending on how decisive you are, is that they are primed and ready for the paint color of your choice.

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Though our house was originally butter yellow, we knew we wanted to paint the renovated version a dark color — something that would help it meld into its surroundings but also not be drab.

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We zeroed on grey blue hues and started testing out strips of the cedar board. It is unbelievable how different the colors all looked in the bright sunlight compared to the color strip from the store. Our first choice, Benjamin Moore’s Oxford Blue turned out to be much too bright and light. So we opted for Evening Dove. You can see from the photos below how different it looks depending on the time of the day and sunlight position. I love it!

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Another big debate we had was how much of the trim to leave white. At first we left the top and side board trim white but realized it made the house look too cutesy and rather small. In the end, we painted everything — even the gutters — the dark blue color, which really makes the white window trim pop.

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Next up: Picking a bright color for the front door. We want something really bold and modern. Chartreuse? Sunshine yellow? Classic red? Let us know your suggestions!

From our partners

portable hot tubs: genius or cheesy?

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This summer during our annual pilgrimage up north to Mt. Desert Island in Maine, we were lucky enough to nab a rental property that came with a hot tub on the back deck. Every night, we’d take a soak outdoors, taking in the gorgeous views and letting our hike-weary muscles relax. Our six year old girl thought it was the coolest hot thing in the world (though instructing her not to try to swim in it was another matter). Back home, the thought of having a permanent hot tub is less appealing. We know we wouldn’t use all year round, and we imagine it just taking up space and getting yucky in our tiny backyard. Enter Vanish Spa! An inflatable, portable hot tub that might be just what we need. The project is trying to raise some starter funds on Kickstarter, so they’re offering a tub for $499 — what they say is $300 off the future retail price. These six person tubs inflate in ten minutes, and come with head rests, 88 jets and a heating system that will take the water to 104 degrees. Granted, the camouflage exterior may not suit everyone’s mod aesthetic, but the idea is you could put it out in the woods and “vanish” into the scenery.  They remind me of nests filled with water. Of course, we need to finish remodeling our upstate cottage before we can think about adding extras like a hot tub.  But it’s fun to dream a bit. Click to watch the Vanish Spa demo video.

What do you think? Portable hot tubs: Genius or cheesy?

 

 

From our partners

cottage renovation: taking down the walls and ceiling

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When we last left off on our Cottage Renovation saga, we were filling you in on the messy, but necessary work we had to do on the sill beam and the support of the house. As that work was being completed by our contractor, Chad decide to tackle another dirty job: the tear down of almost all of our walls and ceiling.

Once we started working to strengthen the outside of the house, we realized how wonky the interior was. Some of our walls were supremely messed up — especially those on the back of the house where most of the water damage had occurred. The ceiling had a bizarre, 70s-popcorn texture all over it, and the walls weren’t much better. We had often dreamed of taking the main part of the house — the kitchen, living room and dining area — and making it one big open space. We also fantasized about raising the ceiling to give us more height. After weighing the cost vs the benefits, we decided to take it all down.

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Chad crowned himself deconstructor-in-chief and hit everything with a crowbar. This video below shows a little bit of what that was like.

What exactly did we find under our walls and above our ceiling? Nothing you would ever want in your house! The insulation in the ceiling was layers deep – some of it was grey and moldy. In between that was decades-worth of mouse nests filled with droppings. As someone who suffers from allergies, it’s a wonder my head didn’t explode every time I walked into the house. In between the walls was the dusty remains of some powdery substance that once was insulation, and of course, more mouse poop.

We also discovered that our roof wasn’t being supported properly. Also, in the attic space was the remnants of an old chimney. Some brilliant person had removed the bottom half, but left the top half, unsupported and made of bricks, just hanging out in our attic and resting the ceiling. That had to come out, too. After the whole space was clear and open, our contractor calculated the highest height we could raise the ceiling and laid down new beams.

After this main living/dining space was done, we decided to tackle the bedroom, too. The difference in air quality was so remarkable, we knew we couldn’t leave the bedroom as it was (i.e. also filled with mold and mouse poop). Here’s a peak at what the finished space looked like. I’ll do a separate post to fill you in on the insulation we chose — and how awesome the new space is going to be!

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From our partners

back to school groove with grovemade wooden desk accessories

Admit it. You feel pangs of jealousy as watching kids go back to school. No, not about the anxiety of grades or making new friends, but of the gear. Why don’t they make a freshly sharpened pencil room freshener? Just thinking about it is enough to make you feel like studying.

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Well, we’ve found some grown up desk accessories that will spruce up your office and inspire your next great great project. Grovemade – the company that makes exceedingly cool device cases — has expanded into making more traditional gadgets sing with their new desk collection. Made with materials that beg to touched, like smooth walnut and handcrafted leather, the items are both gorgeous and practical. The monitor stand raises your work up higher and prevents slouching. The keyboard tray has matching wrist and mouse pads. And since we still appreciate the tactile, there’s a pen and paperclip holder and groovy succulent planter.

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Finish things off with a walnut desk lamp, $99, a modern take on an Edison bulb.

Visit Grovemade to see the whole desk collection.

From our partners

cottage renovation: replacing the sill beam is not sexy work

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Our upstate cottage renovation is moving along at a rapid clip! Before we can start talking about any of the fun stuff (house and door color, ceiling height, kitchen planning), I need to tell you about some of the down and dirty work that had to be done. Warning: It ain’t pretty — but I think our woes are a valuable cautionary tale for all future home buyers. The lesson being — beware what you can’t see!

As I wrote in this previous post, during the winter our pipes and radiators froze and burst. This lead us to having to replace those, along with most of the interior floor. This circumstance forced us to address some issues the house had that we had been avoiding for years: namely, poor drainage was causing the sill beam to rot. The house does not have a foundation, but rather cement footers and wooden sill or support beams. The house is built on a slope, which means the back of the house has been hitting dirt for years — or I should say decades! The previous owner had disclosed that she had found and repaired termite damage, but it was under the house in an area we couldn’t see or access. Cement stucco covered the houses exterior, so we couldn’t really tell how bad the sill damage was. But we knew it was there. Along the ground in back of the house, parts of the sill were exposed to the elements — and didn’t look good.

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So off comes the stucco to see what’s underneath, and the damage on the sill beam is even worse than we expected. In some places nothing remains of the old beam, in others what’s there crumbles in your hand like Styrofoam. it runs the entire length of the house and that damage is like a virus. In the worst spot, the back corner shown here, it infected the exterior wood panels above it and some of the floor it was attached to. It all had to come out.

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The weak support had been causing the whole house to sag. We had to lift it up 8 inches to where it was meant to be. Lifting up the floor meant that we had to remove anything that was attached to it on the interior — which meant we ended up tearing out the kitchen cabinets (which were buil-in after the floor had sagged). It was a crappy little kitchen, so we didn’t cry for it’s loss — but we did cry thinking about how much a new one would cost us!

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As you can see from these photos, our contractor placed the new beams on the existing pillars, which were still solid. In replacing the beam, our contractor (Eric Carlson) had to secure multiple boards together to create a strong support. It is made from pressure-treated wood that is more durable and less susceptible to future water and as tasty to termites down the road. In addition to all this house repair work, we also dug a deep French drain around the back of the house and filled it with stones. Now the water will drain around to the side yard, rather than hitting the house.


See the first post about our renovation here.

From our partners