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adventures in beekeeping: hooray! we’ve got larvae

Yippee! The queen is in the house! After a week of wondering if our bees were in danger without royalty to guide them, we are pleased to report that our hive’s queen is indeed in residence. Chad darted up to the cottage the other day to check things out. When he pulled the files out of the hive, not only did he find that our little winged pals had been super busy producing honeycomb, but they’re making more bees. That’s right, he saw some baby bees! I swear the pride in Chad’s voice when he called with the news was comparable to our first Isadora-ultrasound. It is very exciting. In the photo above, you can see the honeycomb they are building — isn’t its shape amazing? And if you click here you can see the latest video of the fun on YouTube. More buzzzzzzzz soon! — Angela M.

From our partners

adventures in beekeeping: hooray! we've got larvae

Yippee! The queen is in the house! After a week of wondering if our bees were in danger without royalty to guide them, we are pleased to report that our hive’s queen is indeed in residence. Chad darted up to the cottage the other day to check things out. When he pulled the files out of the hive, not only did he find that our little winged pals had been super busy producing honeycomb, but they’re making more bees. That’s right, he saw some baby bees! I swear the pride in Chad’s voice when he called with the news was comparable to our first Isadora-ultrasound. It is very exciting. In the photo above, you can see the honeycomb they are building — isn’t its shape amazing? And if you click here you can see the latest video of the fun on YouTube. More buzzzzzzzz soon! — Angela M.

From our partners

adventures in beekeeping: where’s the queen?

Here it is, one week after installing the bees into our new hive. The time had come for us to check on their progress. We needed to see that they were getting to work, building honeycomb, collecting pollen and nectar. Also, we wanted to confirm that queen was still in there, getting lots of attention and laying eggs (sometimes in a new hive, the queen may leave). I must admit it is a little scary approaching a thriving hive in the middle of a sunny day. I stood back a few feet while Chad got up close and personal with the hive. He carefully pulled out each “file” and inspected it. We couldn’t believe how much honeycomb these little guys had produced after just a few days! It’s so amazing. But, unfortunately, we could not spot the queen and don’t think we saw any evidence of eggs. It’s really hard to tell though, with hundreds of bees buzzing around on each file — as the above image shows. If you click here you can see a mega-sized image. Perhaps you can spot the queen? We couldn’t! We’re trying not to panic though. Chad’s going to check again this week, and hopefully he’ll spot her or evidence of eggs. If not, we may have to order another queen — pronto — and hope our hive survives! — Angela M.

From our partners

adventures in beekeeping: where's the queen?

Here it is, one week after installing the bees into our new hive. The time had come for us to check on their progress. We needed to see that they were getting to work, building honeycomb, collecting pollen and nectar. Also, we wanted to confirm that queen was still in there, getting lots of attention and laying eggs (sometimes in a new hive, the queen may leave). I must admit it is a little scary approaching a thriving hive in the middle of a sunny day. I stood back a few feet while Chad got up close and personal with the hive. He carefully pulled out each “file” and inspected it. We couldn’t believe how much honeycomb these little guys had produced after just a few days! It’s so amazing. But, unfortunately, we could not spot the queen and don’t think we saw any evidence of eggs. It’s really hard to tell though, with hundreds of bees buzzing around on each file — as the above image shows. If you click here you can see a mega-sized image. Perhaps you can spot the queen? We couldn’t! We’re trying not to panic though. Chad’s going to check again this week, and hopefully he’ll spot her or evidence of eggs. If not, we may have to order another queen — pronto — and hope our hive survives! — Angela M.

From our partners

adventures in beekeeping: the bees arrive!



We have four thousand new buddies at our River Cottage today. That’s right, the bees have finally arrived, after being delayed a couple of weeks due to weather. These are Italian bees that were shipped from Georgia to Betterbee, where Chad picked them on Saturday morning. The box they came in was about the size of a toaster oven. Because it was cold outside, and they had been traveling for days, the honeybees were really mellow, all huddled together and softly buzzing. Needless to say, I’ve never seen so many bees in one place. And, I never thought I’d say this, but honey bees are damn cute! Nothing like those pesky yellow jackets or chunky bumblebees. Approximately four thousand bees were in that box, along with the queen in her own special container. To get the bees in the hive, you pull out the queen’s box, place it in the hive, and shake all the other bees in. They are dying to be near the queen — whose box has a door made out of candy that bees eat to free her — and follow her immediately. Amazing, huh? Chad got stung only once. Sadly, some bees did die in the transfer. We think the cold temp may have been too much for them. But the next day, the sun came out and we could see the busy workers coming and going from the hive’s entrance. We’ll check on them in a few days to make sure the queen has made her way successfully out of the box. Wanna see more? Click here to watch Chad’s the installation of the bees on YouTube — Angela M.

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