schoolhouselight1
slabinhouse
housewhitegutters2
wallsdown2
sillbeamwideview
cottageexteriorbefore620
nestyellow
deckre-do
tinyhouse1
alarm_U0A9385

ode to schoolhouse electric. there aren’t enough light fixtures in our lives!

schoolhouselight1

As we finish up the heavy lifting on the cottage renovation, it’s time to start thinking about the fun stuff — decorating! Though our depleted budget will mean that the we’ll be opting for more creative ways of recycling yard sale finds and upcycling Ikea with clever hacks, there is one thing that we are going to splurge on: Lighting fixtures. We are looking for a couple of lights that will go in the kitchen area: One for over the sink and another for the bar that divides the living room from the kitchen space. The mode we’re going for is modern industrial Swedish farmhouse. Does that make any sense? That means that we want some Edison bulbs with simple fixtures that aren’t too sleek or modern.

Our quest has sent to an old favorite, Schoolhouse Electric, which upon rediscovery, we love more than ever. Beautifully made in Portland, Oregan, the company began by finding old milk glass lighting fixtures and reproducing them for modern spaces. Now the company has expanded to include furniture, tableware and even jewelry — all with the same beautiful lines and clean design. But the core of the company remains its beautiful lighting. One new gorgeous design is the Ion C- Series, a playful tabletop light that would bright a splash of color to any office. For our dining area, we’re looking at the City Chandelier, which features 7 Edison bulbs hanging from sturdy chords. Like many of Schoolhouse Electric’s designs, you decide the bulb shape and the finish on the chord and hardware, allowing for amazing customization.

Need more inspiration? Watch the video below and take a tour of the factory.

From our partners

cottage renovation: falling hard for a slab of wood

slabinhouse

Forgive me for not writing sooner with an update on our little house project by the Hudson! We’ve been plugging away, making decisions and slowly getting to a place that we will be able to enjoy soon. The floors are down and stained (but not yet revealed). The new radiators are in place and keeping it warm. The kitchen cabinets have been built and appliances have been ordered. I’ll do a detailed post on the whole kitchen once I can show it off properly, but this morning I wanted to brag about the beautiful slab wood countertop we have found.

We’ve been having a HUGE debate about countertops. As any of you who have done renovations know, they are pricey and every material seems to have its ups and downs. I love the look of wooden, butcher block counterops, but our contractor and others have warned us against using them — especially with a farmhouse sink. We’ll probably settle on a granite or granite-like composite for the “working area” of the kitchen, but Chad and I had a solution for our “peninsula” which will serve as a bar/table that separates the kitchen the from the living room. We are putting a wooden slab on that part of the counter. Sound strange? Hear us out.

We always love the look and feel of natural, organic wooden counters. We see them often in some of our favorite stores and cafes in Hudson, NY. We’ve been trying to figure out a way to have this look in our newly spruced up cottage and have come up with a solution. We visited a local wood supplier and found that they had gorgeous selection slabs of wood — which are essentially vertical slices of entire trees.

Browsing around the warehouse, we quickly learned that because of the size we needed that we had one decision to make before we started. Did we want just one piece of wood or would we be okay with gluing two or more pieces together. The only wood that came in one piece that was least 32″ inches wide — the width we needed for the peninsula countertop — was a pine slab. We weren’t thrilled with that choice for a couple of reasons. First, pine is a soft wood and we were worried about wear and tear. And secondly the “live edge” — which means the bark side of the tree — wasn’t very interesting.

There were so many choices of hard wood slabs that were gorgeous — walnut, curly maple, cherry. We ended up picking a white oak because we loved the bark line and the knotty grain lines within. We also learned that the “glue up” option was nothing to be afraid of. The guys at our shop Ghent Wood are so talented: They showed us examples of their work and the results were pretty seamless. We ended up purchasing two slabs at about $150 a each. They were glued together to make one huge, heavy piece that was 92 inches by 30 square feet, with a live edge on one side. Our plan is to have that live edge face the living room, where we’d also have stools so the you could sit at the counter and watch me cook!

We will be staining the wood but have not decided on the color yet. WATCO Danish Oil was recommended to us, which seals and protects the wood but doesn’t give it a super shallaced look.

Here are a few photos!

nexttoslab
Isadora and I were exhausted by the wood slab choices, but these are the ones we decided on.

slabmeasure
The blue tape line shows where we’ll be cutting.

slabsaw
Sawing in action, with some stain tests at the top.

See more about our cottage renovation here!

From our partners

cottage renovation: choosing a paint color

paintedgutters1

As fall’s rainy months kick in, we are in a race to finish the exterior on our river cottage renovation. After removing the old and worn stucco, replacing the sill beam, raising the house and digging a french drain, we were ready to chose the siding. We had a great deal of debate about whether to go the least inexpensive route (vinyl) or the most expensive (a concrete composite, like Hardy board). In the end we went with cedar planks, which are classic and strong. Another feature to the cedar planks, which could be a pro or con depending on how decisive you are, is that they are primed and ready for the paint color of your choice.

cottageexteriorbefore620

Though our house was originally butter yellow, we knew we wanted to paint the renovated version a dark color — something that would help it meld into its surroundings but also not be drab.

paintcolortest1

We zeroed on grey blue hues and started testing out strips of the cedar board. It is unbelievable how different the colors all looked in the bright sunlight compared to the color strip from the store. Our first choice, Benjamin Moore’s Oxford Blue turned out to be much too bright and light. So we opted for Evening Dove. You can see from the photos below how different it looks depending on the time of the day and sunlight position. I love it!

housewhitegutters2

paintcolor2

Another big debate we had was how much of the trim to leave white. At first we left the top and side board trim white but realized it made the house look too cutesy and rather small. In the end, we painted everything — even the gutters — the dark blue color, which really makes the white window trim pop.

housefinishedpaint1

Next up: Picking a bright color for the front door. We want something really bold and modern. Chartreuse? Sunshine yellow? Classic red? Let us know your suggestions!

From our partners

cottage renovation: taking down the walls and ceiling

newbeams1

When we last left off on our Cottage Renovation saga, we were filling you in on the messy, but necessary work we had to do on the sill beam and the support of the house. As that work was being completed by our contractor, Chad decide to tackle another dirty job: the tear down of almost all of our walls and ceiling.

Once we started working to strengthen the outside of the house, we realized how wonky the interior was. Some of our walls were supremely messed up — especially those on the back of the house where most of the water damage had occurred. The ceiling had a bizarre, 70s-popcorn texture all over it, and the walls weren’t much better. We had often dreamed of taking the main part of the house — the kitchen, living room and dining area — and making it one big open space. We also fantasized about raising the ceiling to give us more height. After weighing the cost vs the benefits, we decided to take it all down.

wallsdown2

Chad crowned himself deconstructor-in-chief and hit everything with a crowbar. This video below shows a little bit of what that was like.

What exactly did we find under our walls and above our ceiling? Nothing you would ever want in your house! The insulation in the ceiling was layers deep – some of it was grey and moldy. In between that was decades-worth of mouse nests filled with droppings. As someone who suffers from allergies, it’s a wonder my head didn’t explode every time I walked into the house. In between the walls was the dusty remains of some powdery substance that once was insulation, and of course, more mouse poop.

We also discovered that our roof wasn’t being supported properly. Also, in the attic space was the remnants of an old chimney. Some brilliant person had removed the bottom half, but left the top half, unsupported and made of bricks, just hanging out in our attic and resting the ceiling. That had to come out, too. After the whole space was clear and open, our contractor calculated the highest height we could raise the ceiling and laid down new beams.

After this main living/dining space was done, we decided to tackle the bedroom, too. The difference in air quality was so remarkable, we knew we couldn’t leave the bedroom as it was (i.e. also filled with mold and mouse poop). Here’s a peak at what the finished space looked like. I’ll do a separate post to fill you in on the insulation we chose — and how awesome the new space is going to be!

housedrywall

From our partners

cottage renovation: replacing the sill beam is not sexy work

sillbeamwideview

Our upstate cottage renovation is moving along at a rapid clip! Before we can start talking about any of the fun stuff (house and door color, ceiling height, kitchen planning), I need to tell you about some of the down and dirty work that had to be done. Warning: It ain’t pretty — but I think our woes are a valuable cautionary tale for all future home buyers. The lesson being — beware what you can’t see!

As I wrote in this previous post, during the winter our pipes and radiators froze and burst. This lead us to having to replace those, along with most of the interior floor. This circumstance forced us to address some issues the house had that we had been avoiding for years: namely, poor drainage was causing the sill beam to rot. The house does not have a foundation, but rather cement footers and wooden sill or support beams. The house is built on a slope, which means the back of the house has been hitting dirt for years — or I should say decades! The previous owner had disclosed that she had found and repaired termite damage, but it was under the house in an area we couldn’t see or access. Cement stucco covered the houses exterior, so we couldn’t really tell how bad the sill damage was. But we knew it was there. Along the ground in back of the house, parts of the sill were exposed to the elements — and didn’t look good.

sillbeamold

So off comes the stucco to see what’s underneath, and the damage on the sill beam is even worse than we expected. In some places nothing remains of the old beam, in others what’s there crumbles in your hand like Styrofoam. it runs the entire length of the house and that damage is like a virus. In the worst spot, the back corner shown here, it infected the exterior wood panels above it and some of the floor it was attached to. It all had to come out.

sillbeamroughshape

The weak support had been causing the whole house to sag. We had to lift it up 8 inches to where it was meant to be. Lifting up the floor meant that we had to remove anything that was attached to it on the interior — which meant we ended up tearing out the kitchen cabinets (which were buil-in after the floor had sagged). It was a crappy little kitchen, so we didn’t cry for it’s loss — but we did cry thinking about how much a new one would cost us!

sillbeamnew

As you can see from these photos, our contractor placed the new beams on the existing pillars, which were still solid. In replacing the beam, our contractor (Eric Carlson) had to secure multiple boards together to create a strong support. It is made from pressure-treated wood that is more durable and less susceptible to future water and as tasty to termites down the road. In addition to all this house repair work, we also dug a deep French drain around the back of the house and filled it with stones. Now the water will drain around to the side yard, rather than hitting the house.


See the first post about our renovation here.

From our partners