retro faucet, modern function: the dishmaster

If you like a retro kitchen look but also want real utility in your fixtures, Pam of Retro Renovation has the perfect holiday gift for you. She just launched a new site, Dishmaster Living, where she’s selling the Dishmaster, a kitchen faucet that looks almost the same as when it debuted in the late 1940s, but is still being built brand-new. Says Pam, “The Dishmaster makes washing the dishes fun via the ‘Push Button Dishwashing’ action of the special aerator brush wand, which dispenses soapy sudsy water and rinses clean, too.” And it turns out there’s more to that than just retro charm — the Dishmaster also conserves water, energy and detergent when hand-washing dishes. Purchase three different styles of the Dishmaster at Dishmaster Living. –Mary T.

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what's a house without a mouse?

Here’s a sure sign that seasons have changed: the mice have moved indoors. Our weekend in Catskill was partly spent cleaning mouse poo out of cupboards. Gross! Somehow a bit of baker’s chocolate wrapped in foil got stashed under the sink, and there was one lucky, fat mouse going to town on it for a couple of weeks. We caught him in an old fashioned trap and a dab of peanut butter. Poor little guy. At least he was living well until the end. The folks at D-Con sent over some Bait Paste pouches to try, but I’m not sure how I feel about poison. Even if it’s tucked away, I have fears about it ending up in the wrong place (i.e. the cat’s mouth). We recently heard a great story on This American Life that featured an interview with the world’s largest manufacturer of wooden mouse traps, and he said that you can’t build a better trap. Does anybody have any good mouse catching techniques? I figure it’s par for the course with owning an house — am I wrong? — Angela M.

From our partners

what’s a house without a mouse?

Here’s a sure sign that seasons have changed: the mice have moved indoors. Our weekend in Catskill was partly spent cleaning mouse poo out of cupboards. Gross! Somehow a bit of baker’s chocolate wrapped in foil got stashed under the sink, and there was one lucky, fat mouse going to town on it for a couple of weeks. We caught him in an old fashioned trap and a dab of peanut butter. Poor little guy. At least he was living well until the end. The folks at D-Con sent over some Bait Paste pouches to try, but I’m not sure how I feel about poison. Even if it’s tucked away, I have fears about it ending up in the wrong place (i.e. the cat’s mouth). We recently heard a great story on This American Life that featured an interview with the world’s largest manufacturer of wooden mouse traps, and he said that you can’t build a better trap. Does anybody have any good mouse catching techniques? I figure it’s par for the course with owning an house — am I wrong? — Angela M.

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help! how do i deal with all this dust?

I’m adjusted to the fact that pets = dirt, like cat hair, dog hair, dirt tracked in on paws. But I wasn’t prepared for just how much dust would result when we added a second dog to our household. Seattle’s rainy season, a puppy who likes to run and dig, and a lot of mud has added up to an astounding amount of dust that builds up on surfaces inside, even though we regularly bathe her and wipe both dogs’ feet each time they come in. I know that dust is a never-ending battle, but do you have any favorite products or tips for making it easier? Aside from hiring a housekeeper, that is. –Mary T.

Photo by Andy Culpin

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gotta-get book: i love dirt!

I just spotted the book i love dirt! 52 activities to help you and your kids discover the wonders of nature by Jennifer Ward on the Anthropologie website. The title alone just about sealed the deal for a purchase. I’m convinced that kids today are much too sheltered from activities such as, playing in the dirt. This book encourages kids and adults alike to get out in their backyard and enjoy nature. Instead of picking up yet another toy for your kiddies this holiday, why not purchase this book and inspire their imagination. — Erica P.

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