babyarms
oceanplastic
barkshingles1
shelterrificjam
Eco-Bin-Composter
fabricsoftener
wsbeekeeping2
fruitflysolution2
barnscreen
burntsiding

30 days of halloween: creepy baby arm soap

Is there anything more creepy than a box of old, beaten up, forgotten dolls you discover at a yard sale? Only perhaps, dismembered dolls, whose heads and limbs have gone astray. Perhaps they have wondered over to your house and ended up in your soap dish? That’s what’s your guests might think when they spot these chubby nubs in your bathroom. Real soap made from vegan glycerin, these baby doll arms will sud up your hands and send a chill down your spine. Baby powder scented, of course. Set of two is $6 at perpetualkid.com.

From our partners

method’s new ocean plastic bottle takes recycling to a whole new level

Lets face we it: We don’t think about where our plastic comes from — or where it goes when we’re done with it — nearly enough. Sure we clean things out and toss it in the appropriate bin, but then what? Even the best intentions can end up in a landfill — or worse, washed up on a distant shore of a far away beach. No one knows this better than employees of Method, like creative director Sally Clark, who spent time over the past year and half literally picking up bits of plastic waste from the beaches of Hawaii.

Method partnered with Envision Plastics, an innovative recycling company, to develop a way to turn rigid, opaque plastics recovered from the ocean into high quality recycled plastic. The slate gray color is the material’s natural state, and is the result of the chopping, washing and blending undergoes during recycling. Slightly resembling a sea urchin with small ridges running its length, the bottle contains a super clean smelling 2-and-1 hand and dish soap, that will freshen up even the worst-onion-chopping hands. The limited-edition product is available at Whole Foods and at methodhome.com for $5. A portion of the proceeds will go to Sustainable Coastlines Hawai’i and the Kōkua Hawai’i Foundation so more beaches can become plastic-free.

From our partners

worth considering: bark shingles for the exterior?


A while we posted about an unusual siding option from Japan: Burnt wood. Now we’ve stumbled upon another gorgeous idea, and this one has its roots in North Carolina. This gorgeous place is home to Brent and Autumn Simmons in the Blue Ridge Mountains. It has a wonderful style that blends rustic mountain good looks with a modern, calm sensibility. Its amazing exterior is made up of bark shingles, which originated in the region in the early 1900s. Beautiful and sturdy, they’re supposed to last up to 75 years. They need no sealers or preservatives and have a natural durability. And best of all, they’re made with a part of the tree that is often discarded. You can visit barkhouse.com for more info on the materials. To see more of the Simmons’ home, visit this Houzz gallery.

We think they’re pretty gorgeous, and love the way they look on a modern home. Would you give them a try?

Photos by Christopher Kellie Design.

From our partners

bookmark-worthy: the jam labelizer

The Jam Labelizeris a type A personality’s dream. It’s a free website that creates professional-looking packaging for your personal Martha-Stewart-caliber kitchen output. Enter in your jam name, type, bath date, and two taglines. Choose a label style and color and you’ll be able to print your design, save as a .jpeg, or share it on Facebook (go ahead, brag about that raspberry chutney).

From our partners

do you compost? novice needs advice

When it comes to being green, I try my darnest to be smart about not wasting things: LED lightbulbs? Check. Reusable grocery bags? Check. Eco-friendly cleaners? Check… Compost bin? … Um, compost bin? Okay, I confess. This is one green thing that I know we should be doing but I just haven’t yet made plunge to saving our organic scraps and making better soil for our garden. I know it’s easy and makes sense, but somehow changing our “everything goes in the garbage” habit has been a tough one.

This new Eco-Bin Composter might be the thing to push me towards productivity. It seems insanely easy. Its collapsible, spring-loaded design means that when it’s not use it won’t take up a ton of space in our garage or basement. It has an open bottom so worms can get up in there and do their thing. The sturdy mesh allows air in for faster decomposition, but it’s puncture proof. It comes with a lid and you can tie it down to an anchoring stake so it won’t blow away. Best of all, it’s only $40.

But here are some of my concerns; maybe some of you compost aficionados can alleviate them for me?
1. Won’t it smell? Our back yard is small and I’m worried about stinking up a corner.
2. Won’t it attract critters? We have raccoons, groundhogs, possum.. not to mention our dog!
3. It is only accessible from the top, how do you get to the good stuff down at the bottom, without making a mess?
4. Do I need counter-top container for gathering kitchen scraps?

Are you a backyard composter? Please let me know what lessons you’ve learned and what products you recommend for getting started. Soon we’ll be gathering piles of fallen leaves in our yard, so I figure it’s a good time to get started. Thanks!

Related:
Zero-Waste Kitchen: Could You Live Like This?

From our partners