post off: do you work from your home?

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This week’s House & Home section in the New York Times was dedicated to the concept of home offices. This article — Home Office Life and Its Discontents — covers the pitfalls such as loneliness (colleagues can help the day go by quicker), lack of motivation (your tv/dirty bathroom/fridge is so close!) and distractions (kids, spouses). But we know that many of you work from home and love it. How do you do it? What are the key ingredients to make it work? Do you miss “the office?” or do you think working from home is the only way to go?

From our partners

post off: how long is your commute?

post off: how long is your commute?

Everyday, during my daily commute, I read the New Yorker. If I’m lucky, I will read it while sitting down. By the time Friday hits, I’ve usually managed to consume most of the issue in my ten or so 20 minute subway rides. In this week’s New Yorker is an amazing story by Nick Paumgarten called “There and Back Again:The Soul of the Commuter”. It’s all about how we Americans commute. Most of us (nine out of ten) don’t ride mass transit, but rather drive alone in cars (about 90 percent) averaging 51 minutes to and fro. That’s average. Others have daily commutes that can be two hours each way — or more. Usually, the reasoning behind this kind of time sacrifice is that at the end of your journey waits a home you love. As someone who longs for a home that is a house and not in apartment building, this balance — home vs. time spent commuting — is something I think about all the time. I don’t know what the right equation is, but sense it might be changing for me. — Angela M

What about you? How do you get to work everyday? How long is your commute? Is it worth it?

From our partners

post off: how long is your commute?

Everyday, during my daily commute, I read the New Yorker. If I’m lucky, I will read it while sitting down. By the time Friday hits, I’ve usually managed to consume most of the issue in my ten or so 20 minute subway rides. In this week’s New Yorker is an amazing story by Nick Paumgarten called “There and Back Again:The Soul of the Commuter”. It’s all about how we Americans commute. Most of us (nine out of ten) don’t ride mass transit, but rather drive alone in cars (about 90 percent) averaging 51 minutes to and fro. That’s average. Others have daily commutes that can be two hours each way — or more. Usually, the reasoning behind this kind of time sacrifice is that at the end of your journey waits a home you love. As someone who longs for a home that is a house and not in apartment building, this balance — home vs. time spent commuting — is something I think about all the time. I don’t know what the right equation is, but sense it might be changing for me. — Angela M

What about you? How do you get to work everyday? How long is your commute? Is it worth it?

From our partners

post off: how long is your commute?

Everyday, during my daily commute, I read the New Yorker. If I’m lucky, I will read it while sitting down. By the time Friday hits, I’ve usually managed to consume most of the issue in my ten or so 20 minute subway rides. In this week’s New Yorker is an amazing story by Nick Paumgarten called “There and Back Again:The Soul of the Commuter”. It’s all about how we Americans commute. Most of us (nine out of ten) don’t ride mass transit, but rather drive alone in cars (about 90 percent) averaging 51 minutes to and fro. That’s average. Others have daily commutes that can be two hours each way — or more. Usually, the reasoning behind this kind of time sacrifice is that at the end of your journey waits a home you love. As someone who longs for a home that is a house and not in apartment building, this balance — home vs. time spent commuting — is something I think about all the time. I don’t know what the right equation is, but sense it might be changing for me. — Angela M

What about you? How do you get to work everyday? How long is your commute? Is it worth it?

From our partners

post off: how long is your commute?

Everyday, during my daily commute, I read the New Yorker. If I’m lucky, I will read it while sitting down. By the time Friday hits, I’ve usually managed to consume most of the issue in my ten or so 20 minute subway rides. In this week’s New Yorker is an amazing story by Nick Paumgarten called “There and Back Again:The Soul of the Commuter”. It’s all about how we Americans commute. Most of us (nine out of ten) don’t ride mass transit, but rather drive alone in cars (about 90 percent) averaging 51 minutes to and fro. That’s average. Others have daily commutes that can be two hours each way — or more. Usually, the reasoning behind this kind of time sacrifice is that at the end of your journey waits a home you love. As someone who longs for a home that is a house and not in apartment building, this balance — home vs. time spent commuting — is something I think about all the time. I don’t know what the right equation is, but sense it might be changing for me. — Angela M

What about you? How do you get to work everyday? How long is your commute? Is it worth it?

From our partners